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High School Course Descriptions

High School Course Descriptions

Math

 

English

English I (Grade 9):

Students will be engaged in reading prominent pieces of  literature such as The Odyssey, Of Mice and Men, and other celebrated classic short stories. They will be writing in different styles: narrative, persuasive, expository, and response to literature. Vocabulary development will take place during each reading unit. Grammar and mechanics will be constantly reviewed and taught to support writing skills for a specific purpose. Research and inquiry skills will be incorporated into most reading units where students will be engaged in the research writing process.

English II( Grade 10):

Students will be engaged in reading prominent pieces of world literature such as The Aquariums of Pyongyang, The Alchemist, and other celebrated short stories from different cultures. They will be writing in different styles: narrative, persuasive, expository, and response to literature. Vocabulary development will take place during each reading unit. Grammar and mechanics will be constantly reviewed and taught to support writing skills for a specific purpose. Research and inquiry skills will be incorporated into most reading units where students will be engaged in the research writing process.

English III(Grade 11):

Students will be engaged in reading prominent pieces of American literature such as The Crucible and recent narratives of the modern American experience as depicted in American Born Chinese. Students will also read celebrated short stories from American authors. They will be writing in different styles: narrative, persuasive, expository, and response to literature. Vocabulary development will take place during each reading unit. Grammar and mechanics will be constantly reviewed and taught to support writing skills for a specific purpose. Research and inquiry skills will be incorporated into most reading units where students will be engaged in the research writing process.

English IV(Grade 12):

Students will be engaged in reading prominent pieces of British literature such as excerpts from Beowulf and Brave New World. Students will also read celebrated short stories from British authors. They will be writing in different styles: narrative, persuasive, expository, and response to literature. Vocabulary development will take place during each reading unit. Grammar and mechanics will be constantly reviewed and taught to support writing skills for a specific purpose. Research and inquiry skills will be incorporated into most reading units where students will be engaged in the research writing process

 

Science

Earth Science-Grade 9

Earth Science is a  full year course in which students study geology, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. The study of geology includes the composition and dynamics of the earth, earth history, shaping of the earth’s surface and energy in earth events. The study of oceanography includes the study of ocean circulation, plate tectonics and the geology of the sea floor, and the chemical and physical properties of the ocean.  The study of meteorology includes the composition and dynamics of earth’s atmosphere, weather related processes and phenomena. The study of astronomy includes the structure and composition of our solar system and the universe with emphasis placed on technology and instruments used to advance our understanding of the universe.

Biology – Grade 10

Biology is a full year course. The course starts with a review of chemistry and energy, building upon the students’ study of the eighth grade content standards. The instruction expands in depth upon the seventh‐grade content standards and reinforces prior knowledge of scientific inquiry and methods. After the review of biological chemistry, the principles of cellular biology, including respiration and photosynthesis are taught. This is followed by instruction in molecular and Mendelian genetics. Population genetics and evolution follow naturally from the study of genetics and lead to a discussion of diversity of form and physiology. The teaching culminates with ecology, a subject that draws on each of the preceding topics.

Chemistry-Grade 11

Chemistry – is a full year course that introduces students to  theories and concepts of modern chemistry. This course is designed to prepare students for college chemistry. Topics will be presented to increase awareness and understanding of the role of chemistry in everyday life and environmental issues. The course emphasizes the atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, properties of gases, solutions, reaction rates and equilibrium, acid‐base reactions, and chemical thermodynamics. The student will be introduced to quantum mechanics, organic and biochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. The laboratory work will develop students reasoning power, the ability to apply chemical principles; as well as acquaint students with chemical laboratory techniques.

Physics-Grade 12

Physics –is a full year course that provides a comprehensive survey of all key areas: physical systems, measurement, kinematics, dynamics, momentum, energy, thermodynamics, waves, electricity, and magnetism, and introduces students to modern physics topics such as quantum theory and the atomic nucleus. The course gives students a solid basis to move on to more advanced courses later in their academic careers. The program consists of online instruction, virtual laboratories, and related assessments, plus an associated problem-solving book.

Forensic Science (Elective)

This course surveys key topics in forensic science, including the application of the scientific process to forensic analysis, procedures and principles of crime scene investigation, physical and trace evidence, and the law and courtroom procedures from the perspective of the forensic scientist. Through online lessons, virtual and hands-on labs, and analysis of fictional crime scenarios, students learn about forensic tools, technical resources, forming and testing hypotheses, proper data collection, and responsible conclusions.

Enviornmental Science (Elective)

This course surveys key topic areas including the application of scientific process to environmental analysis; ecology; energy flow; ecological structures; earth systems; and atmospheric, land, and water science. Topics also include the management of natural resources and analysis of private and governmental decisions involving the environment. Students explore actual case studies and conduct five hands-on, unit-long research activities, learning that political and private decisions about the environment and the use of resources require accurate application of scientific processes, including proper data collection and responsible conclusions.

Basic Anatomy and Physiology (Elective)

This course provides a basic study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include a basic study of the body systems as well as an introduction to homeostasis, cells, tissues, nutrition, acid-base balance, and electrolytes. Upon completion, students should be able to demonstrate a basic understanding of the fundamental principles of anatomy and physiology and their interrelationships. Laboratory exercises include specific organ dissections and observations of physiology.

Marine Biology (Elective)

Marine Biology is a high school level course.  It is offered to all students in grades nine to twelve.  The marine environment encompasses 99% of the Earth’s biosphere and contains an incredible diversity of microbial, algal, and animal life forms. This course will examine the biology of these organisms and the abiotic (e.g., salinity, nutrients, water currents and tides) and biotic factors (e.g., competition, predation, symbiosis) that influence their distribution and abundance. Specific topics will include primary and secondary production, rocky intertidal biodiversity, estuaries, subtidal communities, coral reefs, pelagic and deep sea communities, impacts of humans on the ocean, and conservation.

 

Social Studies

Archaeology(Elective):

Prehistoric Cultures is a two semester course, which “the intention is to create a broad overview of World Prehistory while highlighting some significant events, developments, and cultures.”  It is hoped that at course completion students will all have a “better understanding of changes through time from the evolution of our species to the complex civilizations.” The course utilizes three texts. The first semester uses Prehistoric World Cultures by Walker and Exploring World Prehistory by Weigel. The second semester will upon completion of the first two texts begin a more in depth study using World Prehistory and Archaeology by Chazin.

The Walker textbook is organized chronologically and geographically although some overlap is unavoidable. Chapter one is devoted to how archaeologists study past cultures by sifting through material items that were once part of their lives. Chapters two through four are centered on the evolution of humans, their journey from basal hominids to later pre-human species, in particular Neanderthals and early Homo sapiens.  The spread of early man out of Africa to Asia and Europe is discussed in chapter four. Chapter 5-6 discuss the Agricultural Revolution as it developed independently in many parts of the world. The focus is on what this transition meant to people who began to control the production of their food.  The Fertile Crescent, one of the earliest regions to evidence of food production is explored and then the examination is extended to other sites that show ever increasing cultural complexity.  Chapters 7-14 examine the development of the world’s early complex societies, those sites defined by large populations, agriculture, monumental architecture, and writing systems. Sites to be explored and discussed will include Mesopotamia, Huang Hua, Indus Valley, Mound Builders, Maya and Aztec, and the Inca.

Ancient World History-Grade 9

Ancient World History covers the emergence of humanity and major civilizations of the ancient world, beginning with the Paleolithic Era (about 2.5 million years ago) and finishing with the end of the Middle Ages in fifteenth century C.E. The class will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time, from fragmented and primitive agricultural communities to more advanced civilizations and empires. To do this we will rely upon textbook readings, primary-source documents and various documentaries and films to illuminate the unique features of these individual societies.  The units that will be explored include:

  • The Beginnings of Civilization
  • The Ancient Near East
  • Nile Civilizations
  • Ancient India and China
  • Classical Greece
  • Rome and Early Christianity
  • Muslim Civilization
  • The Byzantine Empire and the Rise of Russia
  • The Early Middle Ages

The High Middle Ages

Modern World History- Grade 10

Modern World History covers the emergence of modern kingdoms, empires and nation states, beginning with the Renaissance and finishing with World War I and the Great Depression. The class will pay special attention to how societies evolved across this expanse of time, from the Italian city-states that gave rise to the Renaissance to the industrial and scientific revolutions that created the technological age we live in today. To do this we will rely upon textbook readings, primary-source documents and various documentaries and films to illuminate the unique features of these individual societies.  The units that will be investigated include:

  • Renaissance and Reformation
  • European Exploration and Expansion
  • New Asian Empires
  • The Monarchs of Europe
  • Enlightenment and Revolution
  • The French Revolution and Napoleon
  • The Industrial Revolution
  • Life in the Industrial Age
  • The Age of Imperialism
  • World War I

American History- Grade 11

American History covers the emergence of the United States, beginning with the European colonization of the Americas to the development of the United States into a global superpower. To do this we will rely upon textbook readings, primary-source documents and various documentaries and films to illuminate key people and events that have shaped American society and culture. The units that will be explored include:

  • Beginnings of America (Spanish and English Colonies)
  • Forming a New Nation (The American Revolution)
  • Developing a National Identity
  • The Union in Crisis (Civil War)
  • An Industrial Nation
  • The Progressives (Roosevelt, Taft, Wilson)
  • Entering the World Stage (Imperialism)
  • World War I
  • The Roaring Twenties
  • The Great Depression
  • World War II
  • The Cold War (Arms and Space Races, Korean War, Vietnam War)

Fall of the Soviet Union

Commerce – Entrepreneurship (Grade 12)

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

Entrepreneurship provides students with an introduction to business organization,management, and entrepreneurialprinciples. Topics willinclude communication skills, variousforms of business ownership and organizationalstructures, supervisory/managementskills,leadership skills, human resources management activities, business ethics, culturaldiversity, writinga business plan, Economics, and other projects. As it is necessary foran Entrepreneurto haveknowledge of so many aspects of business, it serves asa good model for an introductiontobusiness as a whole.

The shape of today’s economy and workplace is constantly changing. Many of the jobs that you willdo in your lifetime did not exist 1O years ago. Additionally, graduates are becoming increasinglydiscerning about the jobs they are willingto do and progressivelymore unhappy with the positionstheytake and with their sense of success in life. This course aims to introduce studentsto whatthey can expect from the workforce and prepare them create their own business if they wish tocreate their own opportunities. With this objective in mind, students willcomplete many exercisesand projects that willprepare them with a broad foundation ofknowledge and transferable skillsnecessary to accomplish job objectives required in today’s workforce and/or the ability to createtheir own business

COURSE STANDARDS/OBJECTIVES:

Commerce and Entrepreneurshipwillprepare students to demonstratethe abilityto operateabusiness, write a business plan, create basic financialstatements, market and sell services andproducts, perform record-keeping duties, apply customer service skills, communicateprofessionally, and display employee relation techniques. The course willmeet the Americannationalcontent standards for Entrepreneurship Education. Students willalso apply manyInternationalSociety for Technology in Education (ISTE) standards as they create content usingadvanced features in word processing, database, spreadsheet, presentation, and multimediasoftware.

International Relations (Elective)

This is a one semester elective class. During the first quarter students will learn major theories of international relations and apply them to understand international situations and issues in the modern world. During the second quarter students will focus directly on preparing for the Model United Nations conference hosted by KFS. They will write resolutions based on pressing world issues that have been chosen for the conference. They will also do research on countries they have been assigned. Finally they will engage in mock debating to prepare them for the conference debates.

Art History (Elective)

This one semester elective class is an introduction to the art of various geographical areas around the world from the fifteenth century through the present. The course will provide foundational skills as well as general, historical understanding. It will focus on a select number of major developments in a range of media and cultures, emphasizing the way that works of art function both as aesthetic and material objects and as cultural artifacts and forces. Issues include humanist redefinitions of art in the Italian and Northern Renaissance, realism, modernity and tradition, the tension between self-expression and the art market, and the use of art for political purposes.

Philosophy (Elective)

This one semester elective class is an introduction to philosophy through topics found in classical philosophical writings, such as the nature of truth and knowledge, mind and body, freedom and determinism, right and wrong, and the existence of God. The main text for the class is Sophie’s World, a novel about the history of philosophy, by Jostein Gaarder. Almost no topic of discussion or debate is off limits in this class.

 

Foreign Language

Mandarin I (Grade 9) :

Students will learn Chinese phonetics and Simplified Chinese character writing structures and component system. They will learn to exchange greetings and personal information in a culturally appropriate way in Chinese. The main objective of Mandarin I is to create a good foundation and basic, and to help them get enthusiastic about learning Chinese. They will be able to manage the skill of using numbers.

Students will learn:

  1. Pinyin
  2. Tonal marks
  3. Numbers
  4. Age
  5. Family members
  6. Self introduction
  7. Time
  8. Clothing
  9. Parts of the body

Mandarin II (Elective):

Students will learn a variety of vocabulary and more grammar with particular emphasis on listening and speaking. The book provides keys to the exercises in both textbook and workbook, and it also gives exercises and activities in order to maximize the learning. They will learn to use conjunctions to connect two or more sentences together.

Students will learn:

  1. Job
  2. City and country
  3. Continent
  4. Language
  5. Compare
  6. Weather and vacation
  7. Hobby
  8. Classes

Mandarin III (Elective):

Students will understand the basic expressions and knowledge about ordering food, in Chinese language and cultural aspects.  They will learn different currency from all over the world. By the end of Mandarin III, they will be able to go to restaurants and order different foods by themselves. They will also be able to describe their symptoms to their doctors in a hospital.

They will learn:

  1. Appearance
  2. Food
  3. Fruits
  4. Ordering food
  5. Currency
  6. Buying daily necessities
  7. Describing symptoms of sickness

AP Chinese (Elective):

AP Chinese Language and Culture course aims at providing qualified students opportunities to further explore Chinese culture and improve their communicative skills (interpersonal mode, interpretive mode, and presentational mode). In doing so, they develop their language proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing.

AP Chinese is a yearlong course consisting of approximately 36 weeks. During each seven-day cycle, there are four 75-minute class meetings. Instructor conducts the class exclusively in Chinese. Students are required to speak Chinese as much as possible. Various assessments are designed in a regular basis throughout the course to monitor students’ progress.

The course objective is to further develop student’s communicative proficiency in Chinese, develop student’s awareness and appreciation of Chinese culture, for the student to be able to make connections across curriculum by using subject area knowledge, to be able to use critical thinking skills to compare Chinese with other languages and cultures and to be able to use Chinese language to appropriately communicate with Chinese-speaking people and be involved in Chinese community.

Students will learn:

  1. Chinese Behavioral Culture
  2. Following the trends
  3. Foods and Clothes
  4. Time out
  5. Festivals and Customs
  6. Issues and Trends
  7. Historical Culture
  8. Travel and Transportation

 

Visual Art

Visual arts include Visual Arts I, II, and III. Visual Arts I begins developing basic art skills and refines them throughout the year. Visual Arts II takes students to the next level in drawing, painting and sculpting. Visual Arts III concentrates on more refined skills in drawing, painting, and sculpting. Students who study art at KFS are well prepared if they are considering Art for university.

Performing Arts

Performing Arts is designed to give students an opportunity to develop knowledge and skills in acting and to explore the elements in theatrical production. Students will study and perform acting exercises such as pantomime, voice, improvisation, motivation, characterization, scenes, and monologues. Students will create their own scenes, as well as study classic works. Students are encouraged to participate in the theatre experience outside of class by attending plays and getting hands-on experience by doing behind the scenes work for productions. Students will improve their oral fluency and gain confidence through in-class and on-stage performances. Students will finish the year with a general overview of theatre arts and with performance experience.

 

Orchestra and Music

High School Orchestra (Elective)

Students apply vocal and instrumental musical skills in performing a varied repertoire of music. The students play a repertoire of literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation written and memorized, by oneself and in ensembles. Students will be able to perform on an instrument in both large and small ensembles, with performers for varied parts. Students analyze the role of music in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting cultural diversity as it relates to music, musicians, and composers.

Music Appreciation (Elective)

Students analyze the role of music in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting cultural diversity as it relates to music, musicians, and composers; they will analyze how the roles of musicians and composers have changed or remained the same throughout history. Students will identify uses of music elements in nontraditional art music while comparing and contrasting instruments, color, and styles from different cultures and periods of history. Students apply what they learn in music across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to music.

Choir (Elective)

Students apply vocal skills in performing a varied repertoire of music. The students sing a repertoire of vocal literature representing various genres, styles, and cultures with expression, vowel shapes, technical accuracy, tone quality, and articulation written and memorized, by oneself and in ensembles. Students will be able to sing in both large and small ensembles, with performers for varied parts. Students analyze the role of music in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting cultural diversity as it relates to music, musicians, and composers. Students will be singing four part music with and without accompaniment.

 

Physical Education

Physical Education (Elective)

The high school physical education class endeavors to provide every student with a wide variety of physical activities and challenges that will contribute to the development and maintenance of their physical, cognitive and emotional well being. Ultimately students will be provided with the foundation for making informed decisions that will empower them to achieve and maintain a healthy lifestyle.

 

Technology

Design and Technology (Elective):

This class will be taking a design approach to the use of technology, and the students will learn how to use professional 3d creation software that can be used in various fields such as advertising, cg and special effects, animation, designing for human use. We will also learn about things such as composition, coloring, creating moods through lighting etc.